Celebrating breakthroughs in Colonoscopy

Norgine partnered with United European Gastroenterology (UEG) to create an exhibition celebrating 50 years since the first colonoscopy in 1969 and the subsequent impact it has had on patients' lives and wellbeing.

Advancements in colonoscopy over the past 50 years

We retraced the major breakthroughs that have happened in colonoscopy since the procedure was first conducted back in 1969.

50 years of colonoscopy
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One of the first modern colonoscopies was performed and polyps were endoscopically excised

1969
1976

The first chromoendoscopy of the colon was reported

The first 4L PEG bowel preparation was launched

1980
1982

NaPic + MgCit was launched

The video endoscope was introduced

1983
1992

UEG was founded and the first UEG Week (UEGW) was held

The first optical diagnostic classification scheme for lesions was published (pit patterns)

1996
2001

The ingestible pill-sized camera was launched for wireless capsule endoscopy

EuropaColon, a patient organisation, was established. This has now expanded to become Digestive Cancers Europe (DiCE)

2004

Conventional colonoscopy was shown to be more effective than less invasive screening techniques

2005

The first 2L PEG-based bowel preparation was launched

The European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis were published

2010

Trisulfate was launched

2013

The Independent European Colonoscopy Quality Investigation Group (ECQI) had its inaugural meeting

The first 1L PEG-based bowel preparation was launched

2017

Norgine, Olympus, Karl Storz and Fujifilm worked with the World Endoscopy Organization, the European Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and US Endoscopy to carry out the first basic endoscopy training course in Africa

2018

The first European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy conference took place

The first global digital patient support package was launched

FUTURE

Advances in robot-assisted colonoscopic systems produce softer, more slender, automated designs that improve patient comfort